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Old 01-02-2013, 10:52 PM   #101
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Bale would have been higher had it not been for the writing for the character in TDKR.
Or that terrible Batman voice.
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Old 01-02-2013, 10:56 PM   #102
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Voice has never bothered me.
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April 18th, 2013, 9:24 PM-????

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Old 01-03-2013, 01:13 AM   #103
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5. Wolverine/Logan/James Howlett (Hugh Jackman, X:Men, 2000, X2, 2003; X-Men: The Last Stand, 2006; X-Men Origins: Wolverine, 2009; X-Men: First Class, 2011)



While we were all thrilled with Stewart’s casting as Professor X in the upcoming X-Men movie, the casting of Wolverine caused us to raise our eyebrows a little bit.

When Dougray Scott was forced to drop out and some guy called Hugh Jackman was called to step into the role, we were all a bit confused. Logan was a short, rough and tumble animalistic guy, and this guy was tall and seemed sophisticated. He didn’t even have any acting credit that we could give him, no one had heard of the guy, and looking into him he was mostly known for musicals. Just seemed like a bizarre choice overall.

When we finally saw him on screen – well, he was still tall, so that was different. Other than that? Jackman turned in a fantastic portrayal of everything we liked about the comics Wolverine and absolutely killed it, establishing Jackman as a Hollywood star and Wolverine as an incredibly popular character not just with comic fans or fans of the TV show but the public in general.

Everything we know and like about the comic book Logan is portrayed onscreen. He’s a bit of a loner, but learns to work with a team. He can be feral, but is insanely protective of his friends and has a noble quality to him.

Jackman does a fantastic job showing us all the aspects of this character. One of the best aspects of him is the fact that he has a clearly definable and palpable relationship with each of the other characters (except Storm, which as I said in her ranking, the blame is pretty much entirely attributed to that character and Berry since he has chemistry with literally everyone else.) With Rogue, we clearly sense that he’s developing a paternal relationship with her and wants to protect her. With Scott, we see that they are in some terms fierce rivals (as hilariously evidenced by his one-claw salute when Scott demands to know if the Wolverine he sees in front of him is the genuine article or Mystique) but have respect for each other, the chemistry with Jean is genuine, with Beast we see a friendly back and forth between opposites, and with Professor X we see an initially somewhat hostile and dismissive relationship (“What do they call you, Wheels?”) develop into a respectful and paternal one. Even with someone like Nightcrawler, who Logan hilariously dismisses as some weird dude who happens to be here that he should ignore, the relationship seems earned. The movies also aren’t afraid of slowing down a bit and showing us the slower character moments, either, as evidenced by the Coke freezing scene with Bobby that pretty clearly tells us that the relationship between the two (without spelling it out too much) is “I know you intend to date my surrogate daughter, but I’m okay with it since you seem like a genuinely good guy.”

I suppose the biggest complaint about this character is that, in films that should be more ensemble pieces, he gets far too much focus and attention. There is definitely a lot of truth to this, especially in regards to the Cyclops character being shafted. But, honestly, can you really blame the producers when they knew they had such a good character and performance going, that they knew for a fact was going to connect with the audience? If this character wasn’t such a delight onscreen, I would have more of a problem with it, but since I enjoyed seeing him so much, my argument is more along the lines of “Don’t take screentime away from Jackman’s awesome portrayal of Wolverine to develop other characters – take screen time away from Berry’s lackluster Storm” (especially in X3). On another note, it’s pretty funny and fitting in some way that the biggest complaint about the movie character (that he takes up too much screen time and prominence) is also the biggest complaint about the comics character, who seems to be in pretty much every superhero team at the same time while also having his own book lines.

Regarding the previous point, I did like how the first two movies also kind of realized that it had a large amount of focus on Logan and actually poked fun at that aspect to some degree. In the first movie, Xavier and Logan think that Magneto is hunting Wolverine for some reason, but when Magneto shows up to confront Logan and Rogue, we see that he actually wanted Rogue and dismisses Logan as arrogant for thinking he was after him. And then in X2, Magneto mentions that Jean could go through someone’s memories to find Stryker’s base, and then when Logan thinks he’s talking about him he dismissively replies with “You always think it’s about you, isn’t it?” and reveals he’s actually talking about Nightcrawler.

And to that point, there’s been a lot of praise for Logan’s interactions and relationships with the other X-Men protagonist characters in this film, but I’m going to take a moment to praise what I actually thought was one of his best portrayed interactions in the film: his interactions with Magneto. As discussed in the previous paragraph, Magneto just sneers at Logan’s arrogance and sense of self importance. And he has every right to. Logan is always the confidant badass – after all, he can’t really be hurt or killed, so he lives thinking he has nothing to fear. With Magneto in the mix? He has EVERYTHING to fear. As Wolverine’s bones are coated with metal, he’s nothing but a toy to Magneto, who never takes him seriously. You can sense that Logan really has true fear and apprehension when around Magneto – after all, (as we saw in the comics in X-Men vol. 2 #25) Magneto probably has the power to rip Wolverine’s very skeleton out of his body if he so desires. Jackman does a fantastic job portraying the fact that Logan’s self-assurance, “bad ass”-ness and confidence is taken off the table when he’s dealing with Magneto. Having the main villain inspire such terror in the character and being so completely dismissive of him gives us quite a lot of humanization. It’s not just his powers or abilities that Magneto dismisses, it’s Logan as a person as well, as evidenced by the line (regarding the fact that Stryker was the one to give Wolverine his adamantium skeleton, being one of the only people able to manipulate the substance) “The Professor trusted you were smart enough to discover this on your own. He gives you more credit than I do.” Given the fact that he’s an indestructible “bad boy,” Wolverine has a great deal of Mary Sue potential, so having the main villain constantly cut him down so utterly and completely, on all levels is a fantastic way of counteracting that and making us sympathize with him.

Another complaint about the character is the fact he, well, appeared in X3. Regarding the character in particular, people complain that he loses a lot of the “feral loner” traits that define Wolverine and becomes too much of a straightforward action hero type guy. Now, while I do have a myriad of complaints about X3, which you’ve read in some of my earlier entries, this portrayal of Wolverine actually wasn’t one of them. I actually felt that having him become a slightly more straightforward hero worked quite well with his arc in the previous two movies, and it was earned. After two movies, he had more than enough experience to cooperate and work as a leader of a team in dangerous situations. And since this particular mission involved rescuing Jean, the woman he loved, there was really no reason for Logan to hem and haw about his heroism. I don’t particularly think that Logan’s straightforward heroism in the movie was a crutch, and think it was a decision by the filmmakers. They certainly didn’t forget about Logan’s previous feral loner nature – after all, Beast’s first lines to him are “Wolverine, I hear you’re quite an animal.” And then, throughout the course of the rest of the film, Logan proves to Beast and others that he’s gained enough experience and maturity to shed that label, and is capable of suppressing his feral nature to become a genuine hero. And it’s not like the comics Wolverine is incapable of shedding this label for the greater good or anything – heck, he’s currently the head of the school for mutants in the current comics.

Now, X-Men Origins: Wolverine…yeah, that movie is a problem. It’s a quite bad movie with terrible editing and pacing. That being said, Jackman’s acting is still quite good and we still like the character, and his relationship with Liev Shreiber’s Victor is quite good and the best part of the film bar none. His memory loss being attributed to some sort of stupid adamantium bullet being in his brain and not Weapon X brainwashing – yeah, that part sucks and I have no defense for it.

As dumb as that moment was, the fact that X-Men First Class completely ignores many aspects of X3 and Wolverine: Origins makes me slightly more inclined to ignore those movies as well when considering the portrayals in them. And, as I previously mentioned in my Spider-Man rankings…think about it, what happened when Jackman’s Wolverine showed up in First Class? The audience cheered and laughed. No one cared that X3 and “Origins” were disappointing. We love Wolverine! We thought about Jackman’s fantastic portrayals in the first two films. A character-defining and actor-defining role that is well deserving of a spot in the top five.

4. Rorshach /Walter Kovacs (Jackie Earl Haley, Watchmen, 2009)



Now, considering that this character is in the top four, you would probably expect a lot in in-depth analysis on him.

But in all honesty – I can’t quite do it. As I said in earlier Watchmen entries, I’m not really here to analyze the deeper issues behind the character except when necessary, because at some point, I’m just analyzing the comics character. And this character is basically the comic book character portrayed onscreen almost exactly. If that’s what you want, I recommend the book “Watchmen and Philosphy (http://www.amazon.com/Watchmen-Philo.../dp/0470396857) which explores each of the character’s philosophies in great detail.

I can’t really analyze the differences between the film character and the comics character – because, really, there are almost none.

My job here is to analyze how the character was portrayed on the silver screen. And my answer to that question is, more than any other character – perfectly. I can’t really analyze this character too much – because the character we see on screen is the same character we saw in the comics, almost word per world and scene by scene.

I suppose I should describe the (very few) changes the character makes from the comics.

The first is that his mask is never really explained. I can understand why this would take up a bit too much time, but I found it a bit odd as the fact that Rorshach’s mask changes images is pretty much the only “supernatural” or unexplainable thing that happens in the movie. Also, I thought that Kovacs’s rationale for using the mask was pretty telling – he uses this particular mask because “the black and white never mix,” explaining a lot about the character, and I wish that had made it onto the film.

Another note is the fact that the character’s origin changed. Now, while I say “origin,” I mean of the character as we currently see him. At the point of his “origin,” Kovacs was already a masked vigilante named Rorshach who fought crime – but really, this scene turned him from a more mild-mannered Rorshach into the one we know from the series. In the comics, Rorshach leaves a child molester and murderer to die in a fire, giving him a hacksaw and saying that its more chance than he afforded the little girl he murdered. The movie Rorshach, however, brutally murders the man and says that dogs must be put down, considering the man no better than the dogs he fed the girl’s remains too. I can completely see how this brutality would affect him much more than leaving a man to die in a burning building, so I bought it.

That being said, despite the horrors Rorshach commits, we still feel a great deal of sympathy for him and understand his world view to some degree, and actually really like him. He is arguably the most important character in the Watchmen narrative, and pulling him off to the sense that we both genuinely like him as well as raise questions about his philosophies is a critical principle of that.

All in all, this character is a masked vigilante with a somewhat terrifyingly black and white view of the world who commits several atrocities – and yet, when he is vaporized by Dr. Manhattan, almost all of us feel quite sad about it, even those of us who knew it was coming. A perfect portrayal of a great superhero, that Haley knocks out of the park.
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Old 01-03-2013, 02:17 AM   #104
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Wolverine's finest moment was in First Class.
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:59 AM   #105
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My personal Top 5:

1. Christian Bale- Batman/Bruce Wayne (Nolan Batman Trilogy)
2. Hugh Jackman- Wolverine/Logan (X-Men Series)
3. Jensen Ackles- Jason Todd/Red Hood/Robin (Batman: Under the Red Hood)
4. Robert Downey Jr.- Tony Stark/Iron Man (Iron Man 1-3)
5. Peter Weller- Batman/Bruce Wayne (Batman: The Dark Knight Returns Part 1&2)
Numbers 1&2&4 pretty much explain themselves but I'm gonna talk about two charecters who weren't even on this list in what I can only assume was completley ignoring the DC Universe Animated Original Movies. Number 3 on my list comes from an actor who people on this forum will most likely know although he might not be as well known to the public in Jensen Ackles (Dean Winchester on Supernatural). His performance in Batman: Under the Red Hood (One of my Top 5 Movies ever not just Animated Movies) is exactly what you envision from a former protege of the Caped Crusader brought to life by a supremely talented actor, his scenes with Batman (portrayed by Bruce Greenwood) are easily the best in the film and some of the best comic book movie scenes ever. Number 5 on my list will be alot shorter explanation. Peter Weller is AMAZING as the Dark Knight in an advanced age unable to hold back the Bat anymore. Along with the original acronym for TDKR being one of if not the best comic books of all time and it's amazing.
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Old 01-03-2013, 12:35 PM   #106
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When Dougray Scott was forced to drop out and some guy called Hugh Jackman was called to step into the role, we were all a bit confused. Logan was a short, rough and tumble animalistic guy, and this guy was tall and seemed sophisticated.
Hugh Jackman looks like a young Clint Eastwood. His casting made perfect sense.



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Wolverine's finest moment was in First Class.
Go f**k yourself.
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Old 01-03-2013, 08:50 PM   #107
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Numbers 1&2&4 pretty much explain themselves but I'm gonna talk about two charecters who weren't even on this list in what I can only assume was completley ignoring the DC Universe Animated Original Movies. .
Those were never released theatrically, this is only a ranking of theatrical releases.

There's almost 50 Marvel/DC straight to video or TV movies, there's no way I would be able to obtain and watch all of them.
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:47 AM   #108
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There's almost 50 Marvel/DC straight to video or TV movies, there's no way I would be able to obtain and watch all of them.
There's only 31, actually. Almost all of them are available on Netflix Watch Instantly, too.

Batman: The Dark Knight Returns part 1 (2012) 77 minutes
Superman vs. The Elite (2012) 76 minutes
Justice League: Doom (2012) 77 minutes
Batman: Year One (2011) 64 minutes
Green Lantern: Emerald Knights (2011) 84 minutes
All-Star Superman (2011) 75 minutes
Batman: Under the Red Hood (2010) 75 minutes, Plus DC Showcase: Jonah Hex 12 min
Justice League: Crisis On Two Earths (2010) 75 minutes, Plus DC Showcase: The Spectre 12 min
Superman/Batman: Apocalypse (2010) 75? minutes, Plus DC Showcase: Green Arrow 12 minutes
Superman/Batman: Public Enemies (2009) 67 min
Green Lantern: First Flight (2009) 77 minutes
Wonder Woman (2009) 75 minutes
Batman: Gotham Knight (2008) 75 minutes
Justice League: The New Frontier (2008) 75 min
Superman: Doomsday (2007) 75 minutes
Teen Titans: Trouble In Tokyo (2006) 75 minutes
Superman: Brainiac Attacks (2006) 75 minutes
Batman vs Dracula (2005) 83 minutes
Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman (2003) 75 min
Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker (2000) 77 min
Batman: Subzero (1998) 70 minutes
Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993) 76 minutes

Thor: Tales of Asgard (2011)
Planet Hulk (2010) 81 minutes
Hulk Vs (2009) 78 minutes
Next Avengers (2008) 78 minutes
Doctor Strange (2007) 95 minutes
The Invincible Iron Man (2007) 83 minutes
Ultimate Avengers 2 (2006) 73 minutes
Ultimate Avengers (2006) 72 minutes
Tomb of Dracula (1980) 94 minutes
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Old 01-04-2013, 02:06 AM   #109
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I was talking about all video or TV movies, you just counted the animated ones, I meant between the animated ones and the live action ones as well (like Hasselhoff's TV Nick Fury movie).
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Old 01-04-2013, 03:31 AM   #110
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NOW it's a comic book thread.
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Old 01-04-2013, 03:45 AM   #111
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You forgot Superman/Shazam: The Return of Black Adam Wyldstaar.... bbf2, my bad man I guess it didn't register completley that it was Theatrical Release only.... IMO the DC Universe Animated Original Movies should have also been included as well.
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:22 AM   #112
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get with the mf program new george lucas of sector 90210, the man specifically stated it's only theatrical releases he is concentrating on. do you think bbf2 wants to be a slave to all your wild ramblings including every known character over every different medium.

Looking forward to last 4 and commentaries.
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Old 01-04-2013, 05:37 AM   #113
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get with the mf program new george lucas of sector 90210, the man specifically stated it's only theatrical releases he is concentrating on. do you think bbf2 wants to be a slave to all your wild ramblings including every known character over every different medium.

Looking forward to last 4 and commentaries.
Ok first point being called George Lucas is not an insult, everyone would love to have 2 extremely succesful movie franchises and be filthy f****n rich. Second point I realized my mistake, admited it, and put forth a retraction therefore your reaction is just being an a****** and nobody needs that in their lives. Final point, why would you even say something like this, all you are doing is debasing yourself through that ridiculous statement. The only thing from your post I agree with is I am also looking forward to the final 4 on bbf2's list.
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Old 01-04-2013, 10:02 AM   #114
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You forgot Superman/Shazam: The Return of Black Adam Wyldstaar....
I didn't forget it. Superman/Shazam: The Return of Black Adam was an animated short, not an animated feature film. The only reason the other animated shorts were on my list is because I was cut/pasting from my database of superhero related movies, tv series, serials, shorts, etc. Superman/Shazam: The Return of Black Adam is on a different list.
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Old 01-04-2013, 05:52 PM   #115
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I didn't forget it. Superman/Shazam: The Return of Black Adam was an animated short, not an animated feature film. The only reason the other animated shorts were on my list is because I was cut/pasting from my database of superhero related movies, tv series, serials, shorts, etc. Superman/Shazam: The Return of Black Adam is on a different list.
Fair enough
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:20 PM   #116
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Or that terrible Batman voice.
Voice was pretty damn bad for the most part, not sure what they were thinking with that when deciding to use that.

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Old 01-04-2013, 11:35 PM   #117
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In the first movie, Bruce Wayne is totally committed. There is no real love story with Vicki Vale. She stalks him, gets into trouble, and he has to rescue her. He has a one-night-stand with Vicki and then tells her he's leaving town. Later, when she confronts him at the batcave, he says, "I'm going to work" and walks away. Michael Keaton in Batman is the complete opposite of Christian Bale in Dark Knight Rises. He has a job to do and he wants no distractions. But then when he does get the job done, which is avenging his parents, he starts to question his choices. That leads into Batman Returns. This is the movie where he does fall in love and sees a future beyond being Batman. Unfortunately, that all tragically ends when Selina Kyle commits suicide. And now... here's the elephant in the room. Is everyone ready for it? Okay..... BATMAN FOREVER. Yes, Batman Forever. That "campfest" everyone hates. That movie finishes the arc. Bruce is more confused than ever and even quits being Batman for some time. But after confronting some unresolved demons he accepts that he's both Bruce Wayne AND Batman. You know, unlike your precious Christian Bale who totally quits and hands off the keys to a stranger. In conclusion, there is an arc. You just didn't see it or chose to ignore the hundreds of discussions we've had about it over the years.



Keaton's Batman doesn't actually kill anyone till he discovers The Joker killed his parents. That triggered the inner Martin Riggs in him.



In the Batman Returns documentary, Daniel Waters says Batman kills because it would be stupid if he didn't. And he's right. Look at The Dark Knight. If Batman had run over The Joker with the Batpod he would have saved a lot of headaches and a few lives.



Tim Burton says that on the documentary for Batman and people take it at face value. Burton is a visual filmmaker and he uses visuals to tell the story. For example, in Batman Returns, there's the scene where Bruce and Selina attend a costume party and they're the only two guests not wearing one. Why? Because being Bruce Wayne and Selina Kyle is their costume. Burton is the complete opposite of Chris Nolan. He doesn't explain things. He expects audiences to figure it out. Sadly, they usually don't. People like to be spoonfed.



Um, not really. After the one-night-stand, Vicki stalks him. It's through her that we learn about Bruce Wayne. With the exception of the flashback, Burton never directly tells you anything about Bruce Wayne. It's all second-hand stuff. Even in the charity event at the start of the movie we hear characters talking about Bruce Wayne before we even see him. Burton is more interested in Batman. And that doesn't mean Batman in costume. That means Batman and his crimefighting progress.



Because Alfred forces him. That's the one thing Burton and Nolan have in common. Alfred spents the entire movie telling him NOT to be Batman. He even has one of the best lines in the film: "I don't plan to spend my few remaining years grieving for the loss of old friends..... or their son." Alfred is actually a master manipulator throughout the Burton/Schumacher series.



No they don't. Fanboys hate it. Parents hate it. And everyone else is lukewarm at best. The Batman Returns fandom is small but passionate.


Gotta admit that was incredibly well articulated, totally agree with everything you said.





I personally liked Burtons take on Batman being a loner and a bit of a weirdo

In regards to the why he didn't say he was Bruce Wayne, it was more of an attempt at being humorous or "flirty" but obviously came across awkward when he later revealed he was Bruce Wayne, and thats what Burton was trying to get across with the character, he was a weirdo and seemed like a guy with issues.

Two scenes to me really captured the essence of Burtons Batman, the scene where Vicky wakes up in the middle of the night and sees Bruce hanging from the rail thing exercising, i mean for some guy who was in bed and banging a smoking hot girl, i gotta think the last thing you are thinking in the middle of the night is to start working out, most guys are hoping for seconds lol.

And second, when he brings Vicky Vale to the Batcave after rescuing her from the joker, Batman says that Joker is psychotic , to which Vale replies that some people say the same about him, Batman almost violenty swifts around and starts to get closer to her saying" well it's not a perfect world we live in, now is it?" or something to that extent, it was edgy, sort of disturbing and really intimidating , and to me that was what Burton and Keatons Batman was about.
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Old 01-05-2013, 02:23 AM   #118
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Ok first point being called George Lucas is not an insult, everyone would love to have 2 extremely succesful movie franchises and be filthy f****n rich. Second point I realized my mistake, admited it, and put forth a retraction therefore your reaction is just being an a****** and nobody needs that in their lives. Final point, why would you even say something like this, all you are doing is debasing yourself through that ridiculous statement. The only thing from your post I agree with is I am also looking forward to the final 4 on bbf2's list.
Don't take it personally bro, I'm pro George Lucas too.

I agree I debased myself, and thank you for liking a tiny part of my ill-conceived post.
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:22 AM   #119
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3. Batman/Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale, Batman Begins, 2005; The Dark Knight, 2008; The Dark Knight Rises, 2012)



Let’s get the elephant out of the room first. The voice.

“OMGTHROATCANCERWHEREISRACHEL.” Yeah, yeah, yeah.

In both the Dark Knight as well as Dark Knight Rises, Bale uses “the Batman voice” even when talking to people who know his secret identity (Rachel, Selina, Lucius) and even when talking to himself (“So that’s what that feels like”) to speak.

So yeah, some people think of that as a flaw of the movies. But you know what? I actually don’t consider that a flaw. When Batman is by himself, Bruce is in character as Batman, so I totally buy that he would be committed to the role and wouldn’t sell it out even in the moments where he thought he was by himself. And I don’t think the voice sounds bad. So let’s get that out of the way.

Also, there were a huge number of flaws with “The Dark Knight Rises” that I’m sure you’re thinking about right now, and it was overall a disappointing movie. Being as that one concluded the trilogy and is the freshest in your head right now, that’s probably coloring your judgment of the character a bit right now.

But please, let’s not let that cloud our judgment too much, and let’s remember how incredible and brilliant Batman Begins and the Dark Knight are.

Christian Bale’s Batman was portrayed very, very well in the Dark Knight. But more specifically, his portrayal in Batman Begins is what puts him all the way up at number three on this list, a movie in which this character was portrayed fantastically.

I had a huge smile on my face while watching Batman Begins. It really is the first serious live action film that’s really, truly, mostly about Batman. As much as I enjoyed what Keaton did with his portrayal, the focus of the first movie was clearly the Joker, who got more screen time than him. In Returns, I’m not sure how the screen time breaks down exactly, but it definitely felt like the Penguin was the A-plot and the Batman stuff was the B-plot. In Begins, there’s no ambiguity. This story is about Batman.

The thing I kept thinking to myself throughout this film is “My god, I can’t believe how perfectly this movie is getting me to realistically believe that a billionaire would dress up like a bat and fight crime.”

His journey throughout the film was great, and filled with lots of nice touches. I especially like how he infiltrated criminal gangs by stealing from Wayne Enterprises – he’s able to get ingrained into the criminals without actually stealing from anyone but himself.

I also liked the use of his technologies and weapons, with most of them already existing and being developed by teams and by Lucius. It would have been too much to have Batman both be such an excellent proactive fighter as well as a guy with enough time on his hands and expertise to create all of his own weapons.

The rationale for why he chooses to dress like a bat is also handled extremely well. The talk of “I want to dress up like a bat because I want to frighten criminals, and bats frighten me” is nothing new, but its handled exquisitely. Having him fall into the bat pit as a child was one thing, but it was also great that his being scared of bats is what caused him to convince his parents to leave the theater, thus resulting in them getting killed, so his fear of bats gets an extra layer and causes him to think of his parents’ deaths.

The talk of how he want an alter ego because he wants to be a symbol is also great, and really sold us on why this billionaire would try to further his goals by dressing up and fighting crime instead of throwing money around to appropriate places. In a lot of interpretations, Joe Chill killing his parents causes him to fight a war on criminals in general, because a criminal was responsible for his parents’ deaths. This Bruce Wayne, however, takes the analysis a little deeper – he realizes that Joe Chill isn’t just “some criminal,” but a man driven to be what he is and created by a corrupt Gotham system. Instead of just waging war on criminals, Batman wants to help purify the corrupt Gotham environment that allowed someone like Joe Chill to be created.

Importantly, the ability to make me believe he had skills at his disposal to do it was excellent. Having him train with the League of Shadows was a great touch, and we saw him pull off and develop his ability to “work with the shadows” and basically act like a ninja, so when we saw it pulled off later it felt earned. His ability to work with the night and darkness really sells what sets Batman apart from just “guy who can fight well.”

And then when we finally see Batman in action during that first fight scene with the criminals, it’s quite a sight to see. Even though we’ve spent the entire time with this character, we know everything about the circumstances that led Batman to exist, when we first see him, there’s still at least viscerally a sense of mystery and terror around him. The thugs have no idea where he is, where he’s been hiding, or how he’s been doing this. Batman was the night – he was hidden in the darkness, and the criminals were all terrified of him.

And like I said, even though we know pretty much everything about Bruce Wayne as a person, Batman can still be legitimately frightening. I know everyone’s complaining about the deep voice now, but I don’t remember hearing any complaints about it in the scene where he is dangling Flass, and when Flass says “he swears to God,” we then hear a frightening “SWEAR TO ME!

Towards the end of the movie, there’s been a lot of debate about whether he “killed” Ra’s Al Ghul by refusing to save him. Some people think that it was justified, that it’s a necessity as Batman is learning from his mistakes, as saving Ra’s earlier is what allowed the current destruction around them to take place. Others feel that it’s a violation of his code as it’s basically the same thing as killing him. Whichever interpretation you want to go with is totally valid. The only thing I’ll say about it is that this debate is obviously intentional – you’re meant to ask that question and debate it. Whichever way you feel, it is absolutely not a flaw of the character himself and is a good way of bringing up a philosophical question.

In any case, words can’t really express how thrilled I was that I got to see this version of Batman onscreen in Batman Begins. Of course, he does appear in two other movies.

In the Dark Knight, he isn’t given quite as much focus or screen time as in Begins. However, I felt that this was totally and completely justified. As much as I complained about the Keaton films not focusing enough on Batman, I was totally cool with him taking a backseat at parts in Dark Knight because I felt the character and Nolan had absolutely earned it through Batman Begins.

And it’s not even like Batman is given the shaft too badly – sure, there are times when it feels like the story is focusing more on the Joker or Harvey Dent, but Bruce Wayne/Batman overall gets more screen time than either (unlike in 1989 Batman where the Joker gets more screen time than him). And he does get an arc and plenty of stuff to do – he has to come to grips with the fact that, although he’s helped clean up Gotham to some degree, without him the Joker would never have come into play, since Batman was the one who escalated things to the degree where the Joker was necessary. He also has to deal with the fact that Joker doesn’t fit in to his existing philosophy – he just wants to watch “the world burn.” And we see his optimism at the fact that Dent might be cleaning up the streets to the degree that Batman might no longer be necessary, and he might be able to retire and live a normal life with Rachel, only for him to see that all fall apart.

On a bit of a side note, I really like his relationship with Harvey Dent. They’re both men who, despite being in a love triangle (although Harvey doesn’t really realize it), have tons of respect for each other. Bruce isn’t jealous of the fact that Dent is dating Rachel, he is a bit jealous but mostly doesn’t really care, as he’s more excited about the possibilities that Dent brings for Gotham. I also thought it was pretty interesting how Bruce absolutely loved the fact that Dent was cleaning up the streets largely in part because it meant that he might be able to hang up the cowl and spend time with Rachel – never mind the fact that Rachel is currently dating Dent! He never really thinks of Dent as a threat and just assumes he can steal Rachel back as soon as he tells her he’s not going to be Batman anymore based on something she previously told him. I usually hate love triangles in movies, but this one was great, since our protagonist doesn’t view the other guy as a threat romantically at all, and instead, very ironically actually thinks of him as actually being the necessary conduit that will allow him to eventually end up with his love interest. It also added some depth and flaws to the character – as we saw with Rachel’s note, Bruce was being far too arrogant here, as she did not intend to run off with him after all.

I guess one of the complaints with this character is that his relationship with Rachel (both the Holmes and Gyllenhaal versions) doesn’t have a huge amount of chemistry. Not sure why that is. Holmes I understand since she's usually regarded as a subpar actor, but Gyllenhaal is usually a pretty good actor so I'm not entirely sure why it fell kind of flat. I don’t necessarily think it’s Bale’s or this character’s fault, though, as his chemistry with Hathaway in Rises is great. But in any case, despite all that, I don’t really mind too much, especially since the Dark Knight had the cajones to do something pretty much unprecedented in superhero movies – they actually killed off the female love interest. Very rare, and it really raised the stakes in a great way and was a great plot point that challenges our hero and what he was planning on and thinking. (Jean Grey and Elektra don’t count since they were superheroes/villains in their own right. And in 2 out of their combined 3 “deaths” it was obvious they were coming back).

It’s interesting to note the parallels in the scene between Bruce and Alfred after Rachel gets killed to the scene in Batman Begins between Alfred and young Bruce after the Waynes are killed. The first few lines of dialogue are exactly the same. Alfred enters the room and says “I thought I’d prepare a little supper,” gets nothing but silence from Bruce, then says “very well,” and after a pause Bruce says that it’s all his fault. In Begins, Alfred responds by saying it’s not Bruce’s fault, but in Dark Knight, he can’t quite say that (because his becoming Batman is what caused the escalation that led to the Joker being created) so instead what he says is that Bruce has inspired good, and that something like this was inevitable. An interesting parallel that I didn’t pick up on until several rewatches.

Batman himself gets some nice moments to shine. One moment I thought was great was when he was dangling Maroni over the balcony, and when Maroni mocks him for not being a high enough fall to kill him, he replies “I’m counting on it” and drops him. Probably his most badass moment in the film. Overall, I think my favorite scene with Batman in it is when he goes to the Joker’s interrogation room. Obviously the audience is fixated on what the Joker is saying and doing at that point in time, but the movie also does a great job showing us what Batman is feeling as well. He starts to listen intently to him, and you can see Batman almost start to be a little hypnotized, he starts to think maybe Joker has something resembling a point…and then he realizes what’s happening, and slam’s Joker’s head on the table and starts harassing him. Great stuff.

Despite his good moments, however, and the fact that he has the most screen time, there are times when we sort of take Batman himself for granted throughout the film. This is largely because of the greatness of Ledger’s portrayal, the huge thematic emphasis on Dent, and the fact that we’re already familiar with Bale’s Batman from the past film so we’re more focused on the new elements.

That being said, for me personally, the fact that I was sort of taking Batman himself for granted a little bit throughout the film made his ending sacrifice much more powerful. When Batman offered to take the fall for the killings, what went through my head at the time was “Oh yeah, I’ve been so caught up in all this Joker and Two-Face and other stuff, I haven’t been fully appreciating the fact that there’s a guy heroically risking his life every day to help make the world better.” I really thought it was a fantastic ending, perfectly earned with what we saw his thoughts on Dent earlier, and you really feel bad for him and the weight of this sacrifice.

(By the way, regarding the “Did he kill Harvey?” debate – like I said with Ra’s, whether you think Batman broke his code or not doesn't matter, because in my opinion it is intended to raise debate and I don’t consider it a flaw of the film or character at all).

So, obviously we all love Batman Begins and the Dark Knight, but there is the matter of that third film to be addressed.

Now, obviously, there are major flaws, plot holes, and unexplained things. I won’t get into them all here, but one of the ones that really bugged me (regarding the character of Batman in particular) was how he magically got back to Gotham after he escaped the prison in the Middle East despite not having any resources. Would it have been too much to show a quick shot of Bruce sneaking onto a plane by grabbing the wheels and crawling into it, or something? A lot of uneven editing and pacing also drag the film down.

There were plenty of positives about this character in the third film, however. Bale himself still does a good job acting. His chemistry with Hathaway was great, much better than with either Rachel. I thought the scene in the doctor’s office was pretty funny, and his scenes with Alfred and some of the other supporting characters were good as well.

Now, regarding the ending. I know some people didn’t like it because of the idea that he’s “giving up” being Batman, but I dunno, I liked it. It kind of made sense to me. We’ve already established in Dark Knight that he’s willing to give up being Batman for his personal happiness if Gotham’s deep corruption and crime problems are fixed (since we saw him consider if when he thought Dent would be able to create peace in TDK). I mean, sure, there will always be petty crime to some degree in every city, but in Begins we established that he was specifically setting out to become a symbol and the main thing he wanted to fix was Gotham’s ridiculous corruption and crime problems. After Dent’s death, the Dent Act more or less fixed this and Gotham became a more purified city with an ethical police force and no mob scene that we could see. That’s why Batman was in retirement for 8 years, only coming back to deal with the threat of Bane and the League of Shadows – with the Dent Act, he wasn’t needed. Now that the League of Shadows threat has been dealt with, it’s natural to assume that Gotham will more or less go back to the purified way it was before Bane got there. I mean, sure, Dent was exposed as a guy who went crazy and killed people, but that particular fact being exposed isn’t going to suddenly create a large mafia scene or suddenly cause the now-ethical police force to suddenly become corrupt. After eight years of being extremely effective and cleaning up the city, the Dent Act isn’t going to be repealed just because its namesake turned out to have gone crazy after his life was ruined – all it means is that it will probably be re-named.

And to that point, the city hasn’t lost the fact that it had a moral crusader who bravely died defending the city and trying to protect it – it’s simply replaced the identity of their icon. Instead of rallying around the sacrifices of Harvey Dent, the city can now rally around the sacrifices of Batman – as shown by him getting a statue. Batman was always intended by Bruce to become a symbol, so I don’t think him giving up crime fighting to live a happy life is necessarily cheating – because he realized that Batman at this point could have more effective and longer lasting power as a fallen hero than he would have as a guy who beats up petty thugs in a city with a low crime rate. So I actually thought it made a lot of sense.

And then…alright, I’m burying the lead. I LOVE the fact that this is the first Batman we’ve seen to actually have a full, complete arc. Even Justice League’s Batman Beyond wrap-up episode “Epilogue” still had Bruce actively working to help Terry be Batman. I love the fact that Batman was able to ride off into the sunset and live a happy life. I know some people think it’s a cheat and that the character is only satisfying if he can never be happy, but I don’t care. I love the fact that we saw a Batman who was able to actually live a happy life…and I especially love the fact that he was able to go off and life a happy life with Selina Kyle. I even liked the fact that they actually showed him and Selina together at the end instead of cutting at Alfred’s smile, which I think is an opinion I’m probably completely alone in. I liked the absolute visual confirmation and the chance to get a glimpse of Bruce and Selina in their new lives. It was extremely cathartic for me.

Even if you disagree with me on that last point, I think the strength of Batman Begins and Dark Knight are more than enough to justify this character a spot in the top three.
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:23 AM   #120
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2. Iron Man/Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr., Iron Man, 2008; The Incredible Hulk, 2008; Iron Man 2, 2010; The Avengers, 2012)



Iron Man was a character that non-comic book fans had probably heard of, but was definitely not in the upper echelon of public consciousness and the general public likely didn’t know all that much about him. Because of that fact, it was unknown whether an Iron Man solo movie would be all that financially successful compared to films with more well-known and established characters. For that reason, when the film was being kicked around in various studios throughout the 90’s and early aughts, the thinking was that an Iron Man movie would need to star an absolute A-list Hollywood draw to ensure people would see it, with Tom Cruise being the most commonly talked about name after Cruise expressed interest.

For that reason, when the movie was finally in development and Robert Downey Jr. was cast, it could have been seen as a bit of a risk. He was certainly recognizable, but after his stint in prison he was mostly starring in independent movies and was definitely not a huge box office draw. That being said, I don’t really remember too many people talking about the riskiness of this casting, and instead most of the talk was about how great a casting choice it was and how Downey was a great pick for the character and would most likely nail it.

And then when we saw the movie…well, to say that he “nailed it” would be an understatement. He didn’t just “nail it”- he created one of the most enjoyable, likable and memorable characters in all of film from the last decade.

It’s hard to quantify exactly what makes Downey’s Tony Stark such a joy to watch on screen. He is dripping with charisma, with the capacity of being absolutely hilarious but also able to be serious when the time calls for it. And throughout it all, he’s somehow very relatable and likable.

Regarding that last point – him being relatable and likable – think about how many obstacles are in the way of that. Everything about the character, on paper, is the opposite of relatable and likable. He’s a billionaire, born with a silver spoon in his mouth, and is also extremely arrogant. His company develops weapons – not exactly the most noble of professions. The very first time we see him he’s bragging about how many models he’s slept with.

And yet, Downey is just such a joy to watch on screen, we can’t help but love him. He’s even able to have chemistry onscreen when he’s talking to his mute robots.Even right from the get go, when he’s talking about the models and displaying his newest weapon, his charisma makes us connect with him immediately. He is probably responsible for more laughs than any other character on this list, and the intentional humor and jokes in his films are really great. Probably my favorite moment is when he is testing out his jets for the first time, but he’s over calibrated them and is suddenly slammed into the wall (followed by the robots spraying their fire extinguishers). An absolutely brilliant and hilarious bit of physical comedy.

That being said, the character is still respectable enough that the slower and serious moments still make sense. When Tony is captured in Afghanistan, the movie shifts tones from being a mostly fun and humorous story into one that is treated much more seriously…and then he starts kicking ass in his prototype Iron Man armor and its awesome, and then he gets back to the States and its back to a lot of humor. This could potentially be a jarring tone shift, but the film handles it perfectly and we feel that it’s earned, and Downey’s performance is able to sell the humorous parts as well as the serious parts extremely well.

And even though the character is involved in so many humorous moments, we still think of him as very real and don’t lose respect for him, and perhaps more importantly, can still think of him as a badass. The moment in the first movie where he confronts three terrorists and they take children as hostages – only for Stark to use his pinpoint technology to fire at the terrorists’ heads and kill them without harming the children is awesome and elicited cheers from the theater.

One of the best selling points of the character, however, is his relationship with the female love interest. Downey’s chemistry with Gwyneth Paltrow, playing Pepper Potts, is fantastic, and for my money the best relationship portrayed onscreen between a hero and his love interest of any character on this list. In all fairness, most films don’t have a slightly older hero and thus aren’t able to cast an older and more mature Oscar-winning actress as the love interest, but regardless, the fact that his chemistry with the female lead is so incredible is a huge plus for the character. The decision to make her someone he has known for years as opposed to someone he has recently met and fallen for is a fantastic decision, but would have fallen flat if Downey and Paltrow didn’t have such fantastic chemistry. The two of them really sell the fact that they’ve known each other for years and have a deep friendship and respect for each other with enough of a romantic edge to make it immensely satisfying when they finally get together. There is a lot of genuine comedy in their scenes together and the jokes and quips they make towards each other are quite funny, but there’s still a very real and deep warmth to it that we can feel onscreen.

With all that being said, yeah, Iron Man 2 was pretty disappointing given the highs of the first movie (not a bad movie, to be sure, but definitely a letdown.) But Downey’s performance was still great despite some of the weird plot shenanigans he had to get himself into – and, ironically, the fact that we loved Stark’s character so much actually detracted from a lot of what the movie was trying to do to some degree. I’m pretty sure the movie wanted us to like James Rhodes, Black Widow, and Nick Fury, but we really didn’t like them at all in this movie because of the fact that we liked Tony so much (despite the questionable decisions he made throughout the course of the film) and were put off by the fact that these three characters behaved in such a superior and condescending manner to him. This is especially the case with Black Widow, who acts as a perfect Mary Sue-type character that we roll our eyes at her onscreen, and we get pissed off at Fury when he talks about how great Black Widow is and how she’s a much better agent than Stark would be blah blah blah. I mean, sure, looking at what Stark does in the film (getting drunk while in his armor, etc) they have a point, but RDJ is so great that we don’t really care. They act like the stuffy parents/teachers in an 80’s teen movie like Ferris Bueller or Fast Times at Ridgemont High – they may have a point, but we like the rambunctious protagonist and not them so we don’t care. The difference is, those movies didn’t try to get us to like or side with the stuffy “authority figures” while Iron Man 2 did, causing it to fall mostly flat. So yeah, even though Iron Man 2 was a letdown, I’m more or less willing to give the character himself a pass for it, since RDJ was still fantastic and it’s mostly the fault of the other characters and uneven plot elements that caused it to fall flat.

And really, as the Avengers movie started to approach, no one really cared or thought about Iron Man 2 at all and were excited at the prospect of seeing Tony Stark interact with these other superheroes.

During all the hype about the Avengers, one of the prospects we were excited about seeing was seeing all the different characters and their powers onscreen with their suits on, using their powers either against each other or with each other. But there were a lot of people (myself included) who while still being excited by seeing that, but were actually MORE excited by the prospects of seeing the characters interact with each other without their suits on, at the potential for banter and personal interactions.

Now, think back to the moments before you say the Avengers and think about which “character interactions” you were looking forward to seeing onscreen specifically. Were you excited to see Captain America interact with Bruce Banner? Were you excited to see Black Widow interact with Thor?

No, you weren’t. You wanted to see Tony Stark interact with Captain America, you wanted to see Tony Stark interact with Thor, and with all the others. You wanted to see what kind of quips he could come up with about them and their costumes, wanted to see him conflict with the more straight-laced characters and cut people down to size.

And when the movie came, it was fully realized. Stark’s interaction with a lot of the other characters is quite hilarious at times and very fitting. My favorite is his relationship with Bruce Banner. First off, the fact that everyone is walking on eggshells around Banner, and then Tony just makes a mockery of it by jokingly attempting to provoke him by poking him with sharp objects is hilarious…and even better, Banner thinks so too. A perfect little character moment. The fact that the two of them instantly become friends is also great. It makes perfect sense that these two scientific minds would click together, and RDJ and Ruffalo have great chemistry and we immediately buy that these guys would be apprehensive about everyone else on the ship and be relieved that they found one person they could be buddies with. Stark stands up for Banner when others confront him, and eventually this relationship pays off in the end as the Hulk is the one to save Stark’s life when he’s freefalling at the end.

His interaction with Thor is mostly limited, but all of us were waiting for him to mock the ridiculousness of Thor and Loki’s outfits and situation, and “What is this, Shakespeare in the park? Doth mother know you hath stolen her drapes?” didn’t disappoint. From a powers perspective, the moment where Thor attacks him with electricity and Tony discovers that this causes the suit to power up to 400% was pretty cool. (Pretty sure the science behind it doesn’t check out, but who cares?) We don’t see him interact much with Hawkeye, but he does get to call him “Legolas,” which I enjoyed. His interplay with Loki is also very funy, while at the same time his comments about how Loki is outmatched by complimenting the rest of the team also serves as a point of us learning that Stark has learned to greatly respect the other members of the team despite his conflicts with them earlier.

It would be very easy to have Iron Man be the comic relief in this movie, having him doing nothing but making wisecracks the whole time, have him basically be Chandler Bing with a super suit. But throughout it all we never think that, and he’s still arguably the main character in the piece (or at least, the first-billed and the one with the most screen time). There aren’t quite as many non-comedic pieces for the character, but he still pulls them off well. This is evidenced by his relationship with Captain America. Naturally, with Rogers’s strict code of ethics, he’s going to clash with the more freelance Stark and think he’s selfish and only out for himself. Their interplay on the ship reflects that, and as Rogers starts to insult Stark, RDJ does a great job showing Stark initially joking and letting his remarks roll off him and then slowly start to get legitimately pissed off by them as Rogers questions his heroism, and then delivers biting and serious insults back. And then in the end this relationship also gets some deal of closure, as Stark reveals he thinks that Rogers “lives up to the legend” and then proves Cap’s earlier comment (“You wouldn’t be the one to throw yourself on a grenade”) wrong by being the one to seemingly sacrifice himself by going through the portal to deposit the nuclear bomb in the enemy base.

One other point to mention is the fact that the movies continuously impress us visually with the various ways Stark is able to suit up or down, introducing new elements to this process with each movie. Iron Man 2 has the great suitcase scene, while the Avengers introduces us to both the awesome scene as the suit comes off him as he walks into Stark tower and then the scene in the end as he suits up in mid-air after being tossed out of the building. Throughout the three films the character’s other visual effects besides suiting up or down are also really great and believable and impressive onscreen.

All in all, Robert Downey Jr.’s portrayal of Iron Man has transformed the character from a second-tier comic book hero into a character that is beloved the world over, and is well worth the number two spot on this list.






And now we reach the number one entry, a classic hero from the 70’s. This one really should come as no surprise. If you remember, I actually said that this was going to be my number one entry earlier in the thread.







1. Spider-Man/Peter Parker (Deniz Erkanat, 3 Dev Adam, 1973)



When 3 Dev Adam was released, there was some controversy regarding the fact that Spider-Man, one of the most iconic superheroes of all time, was portrayed as a murderer and criminal.

The first scene tells you everything you need to know. We see Spider-Man on the beach with his henchmen, and a woman who wronged him is buried in the sand. He then has the woman decapitated with a boat propeller, laughing. He then goes on to strangle a naked woman in a shower.

The sight of a beloved hero becoming such a brutal criminal shocks the audience right from the start, and lets us know exactly what we’re dealing with. Spider-Man has not only gone bad, but has become such a dangerous and deranged criminal that the Turkish police can hardly contain him and have to call upon the heroism of Captain America and popular Mexican wrestler Santo in order of having any chance of stopping him.

But when you stop and think about it, it’s a brilliant commentary on the human mind.

There has obviously been a ton of debate as to whether this sadistic mob boss is actually the same Peter Parker we knew who has snapped, or whether it’s an entirely different character who just happens to be wearing the Spider-Man costume.

The film doesn’t spell it out explicitly for the audience, but it brilliantly gives us subtle clues that let us know that, yes, this is character is indeed Peter Parker, who has snapped and decided he needed to move to Turkey and become a sadistic mob boss. One of the brilliances of the film is the fact that the filmmakers give the audience enough credit to figure this out for themselves without being too obvious about it.

One of most obvious clue is in the scene where Spider-Man has a man’s face eaten off by guinea pigs. Just before letting the rodents loose on his victim, we see Spider-Man’s face for a moment, and he seems to pause and give a moment of reconsideration. This pause tells us everything we need to know. Peter is taking a moment to consider the events in his life that have caused him to come this far – the events that caused him to take the journey, starting off as an unassuming teenager, eventually becoming a costumed hero, but unfortunately succumbing to the growing darkness inside of him and moving to Turkey to become a murderous crime boss. We see the pangs of Uncle Ben’s words and the motto “With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility” going through his head once again, and we see regret for what he has become. But, in a tragic moment, he realizes that he has gone too far at this point, and there’s no turning back, and has the guinea pigs eat the guy’s face off. The fact that so much of this becomes apparent with just a few looks and nods speaks wonders of Erkanat’s magnificent performance.

The film never shows us the transformation that took place to bring Spider-Man to this point, and it’s left up for the viewer to fill in the blanks. But really, it all makes perfect sense and anyone familiar with the character of Spider-Man understands the workings that could have possibly led to such a turn. Throughout his entire life as Spider-Man, Peter Parker is burdened with the guilt of Uncle Ben’s death, and with the burden of having to act as a protector of the public. But throughout it all, he never ASKED for his powers – they were given to him. He puts on a brave front, but inside, he’s always had a growing rage. He has to sacrifice his life and his happiness in order to “help others,” and we know of his frustration at the fact that he has to make such sacrifices and give up the chance at a normal life despite never asking for it. On top of that, he gets no credit for his actions, with J. Jonah Jameson and others constantly labeling him as a “menace” and never being understood by society. Furthermore, his no killing code also boils the rage inside of him, as he sees villains committing horrible acts and always asks himself why can’t he just kill them and get it over with, and save everyone some trouble instead of having them go to jail where they were inevitably break out again.

The exact how and why of Peter Parker’s transformation into a deranged criminal doesn’t ultimately matter, because people familiar with the character knew it was inevitable. What likely happened was that he eventually snapped and killed one of his long-term enemies (likely the Green Goblin or Dr. Octopus), realized all the power and catharsis this brought him, so he went around killing the rest of his rogue’s gallery and other criminals in increasingly sadistic and satisfying ways. Unfortunately, once that bottle has been uncorked, once he’s realized his long suppressed desire for sadistic murder and there are no more criminals for him to kill, he has to start turning on innocents. Horrified at what he has become, but yet unable to stop himself, he moves to Turkey to start a new life, gaining entry and power in the Turkish crime scene.

One of the other obvious clues that this is Peter Parker is the scene where he fools Captain America and Santo into thinking there are multiple Spider-Men running around. Any comics fan knows where we’ve seen this ability before and can read between the lines and knows exactly why Spider-Man is able to do this: during his killing spree of his former villains, at one point he murdered Mysterio and stole Quentin Beck’s illusion technology. In an ironic twist, Peter is now using the same technology he previously used to fight against as a hero, and is now using them himself in his role as a villain.

This movie is the first time we’ve seen the real, inevitable journey of Peter Parker played out to its natural conclusion. In the end, as he layds dying after being defeated by Captain America, we see a haunting and tragic look in his eyes – the look of regret for the monster he has become, but also gratitude towards Captain America for finally killing him and ridding the world of this horrible creature, something Peter could never do himself.

And thus, the inevitable journey of Peter Parker is complete, a metaphor for the very nature of human life itself. Erkanat’s Spider-Man from 3 Dev Adam is certainly not the most orthodox portrayal of the character on the silver screen, but it by far the riskiest, and ultimately, the most brilliant, sending a complex message about the very nature of the human soul, and an obvious choice for the number one entry on this list.
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:03 AM   #121
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number 1 has to be a joke....seriously???
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:41 AM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick1988 View Post
number 1 has to be a joke....seriously???
If you have to ask...
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:35 AM   #123
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Old 01-07-2013, 07:53 AM   #124
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Old 01-07-2013, 08:25 PM   #125
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Due to the unusual effort put into the review of the portrayal of Spider-Man in 3 Dev Adam, I'll let it stand- but only on one condition. Fair is fair, if Spider-Man from that flick gets a review, you have to cover Captain America and Santo as well, and with just as much fervor.
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