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View Poll Results: Rate "Lincoln"
10 1 11.11%
9 4 44.44%
8 3 33.33%
7 1 11.11%
6 0 0%
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Old 11-16-2012, 12:22 PM   #1
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Originally posted at: http://evantvmoviegames.tumblr.com/p...olnmoviereview

Steven Spielbergís Lincoln had everything going for it and simultaneously everything going against it. Leading up to its release, it seemed to carry an equal amount of pedigree that an earlier Spielberg film had, one that had won him a best picture and best director Oscar, Schindlerís List. Both films were dealing with heavy subject matter that are ingrained within our culture and each were being led by strong actors. If you broke it down, however, outside of those two similarities, the two arenít much alike. As the Civil War rages on, President Abraham Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis) works to end the war while simultaneously attempting to get the 13th amendment passed.

What can be said about Day-Lewis as an actor that hasnít already been said? Itíd be tough to find someone whoís seen a handful of his performances and not consider him to be one of the best actors currently working. Lincolnís a tricky character to portray. On one hand heís so well known and on the other hand thereís no audio and video for Day-Lewis to base his performance off of. In a way this helps him simply due to the fact that we arenít familiar with his mannerisms and voice in the way we would be if he was portraying a president from the past couple decades. Then again, heís presenting the audience with a performance that might shape many peopleís views as to how he acted and sounded.

In the same way that Schindlerís List never dragged, neither does Lincoln, which comes as somewhat of a surprise. It can seem a little preachy at times. Lincoln goes through multiple anecdotes to try and convey his messages, and even though they are entertaining, his staff even objects to them sometimes. Day-Lewis is so good in the title role though that it doesnít even matter because simply hearing him speak is a pleasure within itself. Spielberg tends to lay on the comic relief heavily in many of his pictures, and one wouldnít expect to see it in a film like this. The trio of James Spader, John Hawkes and Tim Blake Nelson are the primary sources for it here, and they do a nice job. Itís welcome in a film that can easily become sluggish if presented the wrong way. The three run around for the majority of the film, attempting to secure votes for the President.

With a movie so full of rich, seasoned actors, in both television and film, it comes as a surprise that Sally Field is the weak link in the picture. Her interactions with Lincoln donít fit with everything else taking place in the picture. The same could be said with Joseph Gordon-Levitt who, by the end of the movie, is relegated to background duty. It ends up seeming like Spielberg only felt the need to focus on Lincoln and his son Robertís relationship for about 15 minutes and then throw the rest out. Like all of Spielbergís films, Lincoln looks great. Thereís no major set pieces like in War Horse or The Adventures of TinTin, but the sets themselves are tremendously crafted. The production design in general is what you should expect from a film this scale and Spielberg and his team deliverer on all fronts.

Over their past couple of collaborations, John Williamsí scores with Spielberg havenít resulted in anything even close to their greatest works, such as Jurassic Park and E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial. The soundtrack to Lincoln is forgettable and in a film like this, it really hurts the overall product. Outside of Day-Lewisí performance, thereís not much in Lincoln to make it worth fully endorsing. On a technical level, the film is top notch, but thatís to be expected. Thankfully the movie never feels like a homework assignment and Spielberg is able to coral material that could easily be considered tricky to work with.

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Old 11-16-2012, 01:59 PM   #2
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I'm confused. Your review doesn't match your rating at all.
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Old 11-16-2012, 02:40 PM   #3
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I'm confused too. Not sure if you like it or hate it.
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Old 11-16-2012, 03:23 PM   #4
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Day-Lewis' performance elevates the picture. Compared to something like War Horse, which I didn't like at all, it fairs a bit better. I didn't hate it but it's not a great movie, hence the middle of the road rating. Honestly, I could have knocked it down a peg but it seemed unnecessary due to most of the performances and production value alone. It's just "meh" overall. It's not on a disappointing level that would warrant a lower score because honestly, I wasn't expecting much due to Spielberg's latest output.
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Old 11-16-2012, 05:13 PM   #5
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His rating seems to match others of those that have seen it, but what they disliked he seems to. I've read how the story does indeed drag at times and that was the big thing with all the so so reviews. But everyone agrees that there is alot of humor in this movie.
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Old 11-17-2012, 03:18 AM   #6
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I liked this movie pretty well but I couldn't help feel distracted by all of the relatively known actors who kept popping up, it almost felt anachronistic. It probably didn't help that my friends and I watched most of the recent films/shows that these actors appeared in. Day-Lewis is great as Lincoln, for sure, and definitely gives you a feel that you're watching the real guy at work, and then he starts interacting with a guy who you associate with one role from a TV show and it ruined our immersion. I mean at the onset you have Joseph Gordon Levitt and Tommy Lee Jones, but we almost starting laughing when (especially in the first half of the movie) every scene kept introducing some guy from a TV show we watched and after like 5 or 6 introductions to such characters we were basically to the point of laughter. In short succession we were introduced to James Spader, Kenny Powers's brother, D-Day, Lane Pryce, Boyd Crowder, Arnold Rothstein, Ned from Pushing Daisies, Gale from Breaking Bad, and then by the time we were introduced to Rorschach and President Charles Logan at the same time we couldn't stop ourselves from laughing and speculating at which character actors would appear as which historical figures.
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Old 11-17-2012, 10:59 AM   #7
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Star actor overload.
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Old 11-20-2012, 09:57 PM   #8
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Lincoln(11/17/2012)
Opening scenes are an important part of any filmís momentum, and the opening scene of Steven Spielbergís Lincoln is rough. In the scene we see the titular president visiting a Civil War battlefield and converse with two pairs of union soldiers, one pair white and the other black, and both view the president as a hero and quote the Gettysburg Address to him from memory. Itís a cute way to get the famous speech into the film, but the situation feels contrived and its shot with a degree of whimsy thatís just wrong for the time period. Were anyone else directing the scene probably wouldnít have been as ominous had anyone else been directing but Spielberg has a long history of softening material that could be gritty and his last film, War Horse, was probably his sentimental nadir. However, this opening scene is misleading, in many ways Lincoln is the anti-War Horse, in many ways itís so (relatively) restrained that it makes War Horse look like some sort of throw away project that Spielberg put together so that he could purge all his worst instincts in preparation for his ambitious project about our 16th president.

Saying that this is a project about Abraham Lincoln actually isnít entirely true; contrary to what is implied by the title this isnít really a biopic. The film focuses almost entirely on the political machinations required in order to pass the thirteenth amendment through the House of Representatives, which firmly put an end to slavery once the Civil War ended. Abraham Lincoln (played here by Daniel Day-Lewis) is obviously a major participant in this movement, but heís not really the filmís focus for much of its run time. The film is actually an ensemble piece consisting of dozens of speaking roles and depicts the wide range of characters that needed to work together in order to get the 2/3 vote needed to pass the amendment. We see this from the perspective of Lincoln, his cabinet member, his family, his political allies, his lobbyists, and also from the perspective of some of the lowly representatives who would pass the deciding votes.

Some of the standout cast members include Tommy Lee Jones as the radical abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens, who steals a number of scenes with his acerbic wit and passion. Hal Holbrook also steals scenes in the role of Francis Preston Blair, an aging member of the Republicanís conservative wing which is more interested in ending the war than freeing slaves.
Itís not just the actors playing famous historical figures that stand out. Actors like James Spader and John Hawks, who both play party operatives trying to sway moderate Democrats over to their side, are just as noteworthy and memorable as actors like David Strathairn and Jared Harris (who play William Seward and Ulysses S. Grant respectively). I could go on and on like that; this cast is absolutely stacked with top rate talent doing great work in interesting roles.

Of course one couldnít begin to talk about the acting in this film without getting into the work that Daniel Day-Lewis does as Lincoln himself. Day-Lewis is amazing here both for how good his imitation of honest Abe is but also how well he restrains himself in order to blend in with his cast. Assisted by some excellent makeup, Day Lewis looks exactly like Lincoln and he conducts himself with all the dignity that one expects of the role. It would have been easy for Day-Lewis to beat his chest throughout the film and command every second of his screentime as he did in Gangs of New York and There Will Be Blood (two films where such acting was entirely appropriate), but instead he comes across entirely human and thoughtful. After a while I stopped thinking of the man on screen as a role being played by an actor, it just felt like I was watching the Abraham Lincoln up on the screen and only occasionally would I stop and think ďwait a minute, this is actually the dude from The Last of the Mohicans, thatís amazing.Ē

The filmís dialogue is at times a little lofty and theatrical. Itís clear that the script, written by Pulitzer prize winner Tony Kushner, has cherry-picked many of the finest quotes from all of these politician and put them into basic conversations between characters and that can seem a little hard to swallow at times. Lincoln himself comes off a little too much like an OG Jed Bartlet at times, especially when he continuously comes up with wise historical anecdotes for almost every situation, and his speechifying does strain credibility at times. Still, I canít help but be amazed at just how effectively Kushner was able to bring all of these complicated political dealings to the screen in such a highly efficient and accessible way. The screenplay perfectly explains all the stakes involved and all the maneuvers therein without ever talking down to the audience and while still having time for personal character arcs and moments of comic relief.

Meanwhile, Steven Spielberg manages to bring this script to the screen in a way that is, for him, very restrained and dignified. Spielberg edits the film at a brisk pace which gives the film a nice sense of immediacy and he also avoids sentimentality more often than he doesnít. From a visual perspective this probably isnít one of his best, but itís hardly ugly. Much of the action takes place in very dark light (which is accurate given that this is set in Washington before the advent of electricity), and that may be off putting for some, but Janusz Kamińskiís cinematography does get its job done. I wonít say that Spielbergís less savory habits donít pop up occasionally in the form of some overly dramatic music ques (though John Williams is wisely restrained for much of the film) and a couple of other questionable moments. For the most part though, Spielberg more than acquits himself and has staged a nice comeback from the disaster that was War Horse.

Opening wide just a week after a closely won but highly impassioned election, Lincoln couldnít be any more relevant today. We worship Abraham Lincoln today but one could hardly imagine a more divisive figure in his day what with half the country partaking in an armed rebellion against his leadership. Even without confederate politicians in Washington we still see passions running incredibly high on the floor of the House of Representatives. The representatives on the floor actively hurl insults at one another and fight and bicker and scheme against one another with incredible rancor. Watching Linconís men work day and night to pass the amendment I couldnít help but think of all the trouble Barack Obama went through to pass his Healthcare Reform bill. The stakes in passing that bill werenít as high as they were for the thirteenth amendment, and his opposition wasnít asÖ treasonous as Lincolnís was, but the parallels are still there. If anything the political process in this country has changed a lot less than we like to think.

Perhaps one of the things to be learned from this period of history is that the greatest leaders arenít necessarily the ones who play it safe, nor are they always going to be the ones who unite disparate parties. There are some things that are simply too important to allow to continue just because the status quo will keep the opposition at bay. Lincoln was a man who, by the late stages of the Civil War, could no longer compromise about slavery and may have paid with his life for standing by that conviction. Still, the legacy of what he was able to accomplish lives on. Thatís something to consider when, at the moment, there is much talk of a need to compromise in order to get things done in Washington and this film is full of compromise. Lincoln spends a great deal of time thinking back on previous compromises like the Emancipation Proclamation and regretting that they are mere half steps. He also compromises in order to get the conservative wing of his party to vote with him. Furthermore, he finds himself compromising some of his loftier principles by making under the table deals for votes and by lying at certain stages of the process in order to keep the vote on the floor. Other figures like Thaddeus Stevens also find themselves compromising some of their rhetoric for the greater good. And yet, all of this compromise is done in order to reach a noble end: the abolition of slavery once and for all, and on that principle there could be no compromise.

Iíd love to say that Lincoln is somehow perfect, but it certainly isnít. It never really finds the right place to stop, and after the passage of the thirteenth amendment the film sort of forgets that it isnít really a biopic and keeps going. Iím also not fully convinced that Spielberg was the right person to bring this script to the screen. I can just imagine how well this would have worked in the hands of someone like Michael Mann or Paul Greengrass or someone else who could have really given this the feel of a quick moving modern political thriller that just happened to take place in 1865. Still, so much of Lincoln works so well that I canít help but whole heartedly endorse it. When all is said and donít it probably wonít be canonized next to Jaws, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Saving Private Ryan, and Munich within the highest ranks of Spielbergís filmography, but it is still an amazing work of historical cinema made by some of Hollywoodís finest talent.
**** out of Four
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Old 11-21-2012, 04:35 PM   #9
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I'm starting to change my mind on this, and now I think I would really like to see it.
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Old 12-04-2012, 08:08 PM   #10
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I can sum up my thoughts on this movie pretty quickly: slow first half, but an excellent second half. The acting is, of course, the highlight with Day Lewis being phenomenal once again. I see some reviewers' point about it feeling more like a stage play caught on film, though, and while there were times where this worked, there were others where it got kind of tedious. Speaking of tedious, I also felt the film was a bit too long. You could definitely feel the length at times.

Overall, though, this is still a very solid piece of work and I'd say I still liked it better than I thought I would.

***1/2 /****
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:21 AM   #11
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Lincoln (2012)

After the snooze fest that was War Horse, I was concerned for a repeat with a 180 minute biopic of Lincoln. Fortunately, it wasn’t boring, and not even really a biopic. It goes without saying that Daniel Day-Lewis is amazing in this movie. This is very fortunate, too, because with most of his scenes being centered on speeches or telling little stories like a senile, old grandfather, his role in this movie would have been tedious and clichťd under someone else less talnted. Instead, you get behind every word and nuance, just like the silenced characters around him. But at the heart of this movie is the passing of an amendment to end slavery and have all men treated equally. This allowed for invigorating courtroom scenes, but also comical ones, mostly led by James Spader and his crew who are set about gaining votes for the House. Tommy Lee Jones and Sally Field as Mary Todd Lincoln also give standout performances.

This film doesn’t take much advantage of Spielberg’s technical expertise as most of it takes place indoors and revolves around characters, but there are still some standout scenes such as the gritty and brutal opening Civil War battle. I was a bit put off by the Williams score at times, however. I’m not sure if this had more to to do with how it would often start in the middle of a scene or speech, or if it was because I’ve had enough of the Ken Burns-esque, 19th-century old-timey music for one lifetime.

***.5/****
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:48 AM   #12
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2011 was not Steven Spielbergís best year as a filmmaker, at least as far as quality goes. After going four years without directing a film (his last before being Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull), Spielberg struck back with two underwhelming films. First was The Adventures of Tintin. The film wasnít really bad, but I found myself unable to connect with it and was overall disappointed. Things got even worse with War Horse. Again, not a terrible film, but overall the film was overly sentimental and I couldnít connect with it. While both films do have their strengths, Iíd also say both are unworthy of Spielberg. I had hoped Spielberg would bounce back, and a biopic on Abraham Lincoln with Daniel-Day Lewis in the lead sounded like it could be the property to do it.

Despite what the title suggests, Lincoln is not an all encompassing biopic of Abraham Lincolnís life. Instead, the film focuses on Abraham Lincolnís (Daniel-Day Lewis) efforts to pass the thirteenth constitutional amendment abolishing slavery. Lincoln is aided by congress leader Thaddeus Stevens (Tommy Lee Jones) secretary of state William Seward (David Strathairn). Lincolnís struggle takes a toll on him, his wife Mary (Sally Field), and son Robert (Joseph Gordon-Levitt).

The main draw and highlight of Lincoln is Daniel-Day Lewisí performance as the sixteenth president. Lewis is one of the most praised actors of his generation and his presence always creates high expectations, expectations which are heightened by him playing such a colourful role. Lewis completely lives up to said expectations. He effortlessly slips into Lincolnís skin and one quickly forgets they are watching a performance. Lewis also succeeds at bringing Lincolnís troubled feelings and inner struggles to the film, but what is most impressive is how Lewis disappears into the character. Daniel-Day Lewis will likely receive an Oscar nomination for his work here and Iíd say it is deserved.

The supporting cast is full of great work as well. Tommy Lee Jones gives his best performance since No Country for Old Men. While not an overly deep or layered performance, Jones injects the film with a mix of energy and sophistication while entertaining thoroughly. Sally Field delivers a lot of emotion and pain through her portrayal of Abrahamís wife Mary. Her work is very powerful and worthy of awards consideration. The rest of the cast is filled out with talented actors such as Joseph Gordon-Levitt, David Strathairn, Jackie Earle Haley, and John Hawkes.

One thing I will give Tintin and War Horse credit for is that they, like most Spielberg films, had top-notch production values. This is true of Lincoln as well. The costumes and art-direction are effective in immersing one in the time period the film is trying to create, and the spectacle shown in the few battle scenes is quite impressive. The film is also shot and edited well. The score from John Williams is disappointing in as much as heís done far better work, but the music was not distracting either.

For all the good things I have to say about Lincoln, the film is hindered by the fact that at the end of the day itís a history lesson. A well acted and well directed history lesson, but a history lesson all the same. As a history lesson, Lincoln works very well, but as a film it leaves a little to be desired. That isnít to say Lincoln is a bad film, I just wish there was more meat to chew on.

Overall, itís fair to say Spielberg succeeded in his goals with Lincoln. He told the story he wanted to tell, managed to get great performances from his cast, and delivered effective technical elements. The problem is the film doesnít offer much outside of that. It works fine but I wish Spielberg had taken a risk and reached further. That said, Lincoln is a good film and Spielbergís best since Munich. It isnít quite the return to form I was hoping for, but itís a step in the right direction.

Rating: B+
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Old 12-28-2012, 09:35 AM   #13
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When I heard that Spielberg was doing a biopic of Lincoln, I groaned. It pained me to see one of my favourite directors wasting his talents on an unoriginal, boring biopic. Keep in mind I had not seen the movie yet, this was all based on assumptions. But as the film released and I learned more about it, I discovered that it wasn't a lame birth-to-death biopic so much as a snapshot in the life of one of the greatest figures in history. That's when I became interested.

Indeed, Lincoln does manage to escape the usual trappings of biopics by focusing the story to passing the 13th amendment. Other important aspects of his life, such as his son dying early and his relationship with his father, are touched upon but not dragged before us through linear storytelling, which is where other more monotonous biopics (Walk the Line, The Aviator) falter. However, on this note I will say that I was disappointed that they dealt with his assassination as I felt the tightness of the story unraveled a bit and it was actually quite unnecessary in the scope of the story being told. I guess Spielberg just couldn't resist.

I loved this movie. I need to mention here that I am a huge fan of The West Wing, and Lincoln felt like 19th Century West Wing to me, which definitely won me over. The politics behind getting this bill passed is not as dull as one may think and in fact plays out quite fascinatingly.

And just like The West Wing, Lincoln relies heavily on its dialogue which is, glad to say, outstanding. It has just the right amount of humour and seriousness, with the humour being just pithy enough and the seriousness holding just the right weight so that its not too corny and not ineffectual.

But the real showcase of this movie is the performances. Spielberg puts together a solid ensemble of supporting characters for this film. Tommy Lee Jones plays Thaddeus Stevens and is a joy to watch. David Strathairn plays secretary of state Seward with solid conviction. Sally Field turns the role of Mary Todd Lincoln from what could be a predictable performance for that type of role into something rather surprising. But above it all is the incredible performance of Daniel Day Lewis as the man in the stovepipe hat himself. Lewis' performance is pure genius. He manages to make this larger-than-life figure feel human and relatable. He is soft-spoken yet the characters in the film and the members of the audience are always drawn towards what he is saying. He just sells it; every part of it.

Lincoln is certainly one of Spielberg's best films of the last decade. It is chock-full of great acting, great writing, and it looks fantastic too. The book ends of this film are its weaknesses; the cheesy opening scene and the unnecessary, drawn-out ending. However everything in between is pure historical gold.
9/10
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Old 04-28-2013, 05:09 AM   #14
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Steven Spielberg and Daniel Day-Lewis re-team for Obama


VIDEO-CLick to Watch!:
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Old 04-28-2013, 12:24 PM   #15
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Genius.
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Old 04-30-2013, 05:03 AM   #16
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lincoln was no silver linings playbook but it was great in it's own way .
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